Introduction

The Macheo Secondary School Program (SSP) provides the most vulnerable children an opportunity to attend and complete a high school education. Macheo selects committed but vulnerable children, assists them in enrollment at an appropriate school, sponsors their admission, and provides guidance during their school career in order to assure success. Currently Macheo sponsors 70 children within this ongoing program.

How does the program work?

In Kenya only 20% of the children will attend secondary school due to financial constraints, or the lack of knowledge of the parents or guardians. Often the SSP is their only opportunity to attend a secondary school. Macheo meticulously selects the children for the MSSP by evaluating the child’s commitment, the aptitude of the parents, the academic results thus far and finally the vulnerability of the child.

Families are provided with advice on how to make an informed and realistic choice for their child’s high school education. The selection process is governed by the child‘s home situation, academic performance and their personal motivation. They might attend a public school, but if the child lives in an unsafe neighborhood, Macheo will arrange for the child to attend a boarding school.

Throughout their secondary school years, we empower the family with information and guidance so that they are better able to make viable decisions. Career guidance is also offered through professional seminars. When the children are enrolled in a school, SSP follows them and supports them to ensure that they complete their schooling. Macheo monitors the consistency of the academic performance of a child and strives to engage the parents and guardians to show parental responsibility at home. Macheo provides more guidance and psychosocial support when needed. This can be done through subsequent school visits by our social workers.

Facts

  • At the moment 29 boys and 41 girls are sponsored in our secondary program.
  • In 2014 -6 children completed their Secondary school education.
  • In 2014 -7 special needs children were sponsored by the Secondary School Program